Museum Visitors

Museum Visitors

The museum includes photographs and historical memorabilia from the Carter presidency (1977 - 1981).

Archival Research

Archival Research

Archivists can provide reference services for the unique historical material available for research in the Library's holdings.

Educator and Kids

Educators/Kids

Quality educational materials and experiences for students, educators, and the public.

The Jimmy Carter Presidential Library and Museum in Atlanta, Georgia houses U.S. President Jimmy Carter's papers and other material relating to the Carter Administration and the Carter family's life.

EVENTS & EXHIBITS

    • “Countdown to Zero: Defeating Disease”
      Exhibit January 11, 2017-December 16, 2017

      Only one human disease, smallpox, has ever been eradicated. But soon a second infection will join the list: Guinea worm disease, a painful and debilitating condition caused by the Guinea worm—known to many as the “fiery serpent”. There is no medicine to cure Guinea worm disease and no vaccine to prevent it. Yet it can be stopped. This exhibition shows the heroic efforts throughout history to eradicate, eliminate, and control disease, including the Carter Center-led campaign to wipe out Guinea worm.

    • Issa Touma - “9 Days - From My Window in Aleppo”
      Film Screenings October 23, 2017

      Screening/Discussion

      Carter Presidential Library & Museum Theater

      Free and Open to the Public

      This is a firsthand view of the first nine days of the rapidly changing uprising in Aleppo, from the observations recorded by the renowned Syrian photographer Issa Touma from his window in the old city. A discussion will follow the screening, in partnership with Atlanta Celebrates Photography.

    • Richard Rothstein - “The Color of Law”
      Author Programs October 24, 2017

      Lecture/Booksigning

      Carter Presidential Library & Museum Theater

      Free and Open to the Public

      In this groundbreaking history of the modern American metropolis, Rothstein explodes the myth that America’s cities came to be racially divided through de facto segregation. Rather, “The Color of Law” incontrovertibly makes clear that it was de jure segregation―the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal governments―that actually promoted the discriminatory patterns that continue to this day.

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