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The Hostage Crisis in Iran

On November 4, 1979, Iranian militants stormed the United States Embassy in Tehran and took approximately seventy Americans captive. This terrorist act triggered the most profound crisis of the Carter presidency and began a personal ordeal for Jimmy Carter and the American people that lasted 444 days.

President Carter committed himself to the safe return of the hostages while protecting America’s interests and prestige. He pursued a policy of restraint that put a higher value on the lives of the hostages than on American retaliatory power or protecting his own political future.

The toll of patient diplomacy was great, but President Carter’s actions brought freedom for the hostages with America’s honor preserved.

Mohammed Reza Pahlavi, Shah of Iran, began his reign in 1941, succeeding his father, Reza Khan, to the throne. In a 1953 power struggle with his prime minister, the Shah gained American support to prevent nationalization of Iran’s oil industry. In return for assuring the U.S. a steady supply of oil, the Shah received economic and military aid from eight American presidents.

Early in the 1960s, the Shah announced social and economic reforms but refused to grant broad political freedom. Iranian nationalists condemned his U.S. supported regime and his “westernizing” of Iran. During rioting in 1963, the Shah cracked down, suppressing his opposition. Among those arrested and exiled was a popular religious nationalist and bitter foe of the United States, the Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini.

Between 1963 and 1979, the Shah spent billions of oil dollars on military weapons. The real price of military strength was the loss of popular support. Unable to sustain economic progress and unwilling to expand democratic freedoms, the Shah’s regime collapsed in revolution. On January 16, 1979, the Shah fled Iran, never to return.

The exiled Ayatollah Khomeini returned to Tehran in February 1979 and whipped popular discontent into rabid anti-Americanism. When the Shah came to America for cancer treatment in October, the Ayatollah incited Iranian militants to attack the U.S. On November 4, the American Embassy in Tehran was overrun and its employees taken captive. The hostage crisis had begun.

  • The Hostages and The Casualties
    This list was adapted from information in Free At Last by Doyle McManus.

  • Iran Hostage’s Diary
    A prison journal was kept by Robert C. Ode after being taken captive by Iranian student terrorists at the American embassy in Tehran. Ode donated the diary and other correspondence to the Carter archives.

  • Rescue Mission Report
    Instructions on retrieving the Iranian Hostage Crisis “Rescue Mission Report” from the Lloyd Norton Cutler Files.

  • The Tehran Six
    Select documents related to the “Canadian Caper” and the “Tehran Six”.

  • Select Records at the Jimmy Carter Library Related to the Iran Hostage Crisis
    Additional select documents regarding the Iran hostage crisis are described in this curated list. You can contact the Library for information on these records and additional records on this topic available in our holdings.

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